Y O L O

In the past 9 months I’ve done a whole lot of travelling; 6 different countries to be exact. That’s probably no big deal for any other individual, but it may sound slightly extreme for someone who is living with sickle cell. It has taken me years to be able to travel this much without risk and without fear; but believe me I have taken many L’s in the process.

Everyone wants to go on that β€˜girls trip’ or β€˜guys trip’ and I was no different, but I had to make the decision to miss out on many of these since sickle cell was not my best friend throughout my teenage years and early twenties. I missed countless girl’s trips and family holidays and lost out on everlasting memories as well as a lot of money. It sounds unbelievable when I think about it now. But I can say that I have always, sometimes reluctantly, put my health first when it comes to making travel plans.

The reason I am sharing this is not to gloat, but actually because of a comment that was made by a random person on my return from a recent holiday, which has since stuck with me. I assume they felt the need to make a comment since I had requested special assistance so I was in a wheel chair, and mobility aids such a crutches or wheelchairs seem to be an open invitation for people to pre judge.

β€œRisked it for a few days of fun yeh?”

Listen, some people may not know what a risk assessment is, but anyone living with sickle cell should and will most likely know; since the condition is so unpredictable and a crisis can literally come on at any time. Sometimes every day has to be an evaluation of likely risks, and what precautions I can have in place just in case a crisis comes on.

Every holiday I have chosen not to book, cancelled, or missed, has always been because of one rule I have which I will never ever break:

#RULE: ONLY TRAVEL AT 100%

I don’t know about you, but I feel uneasy leaving my house if my phone is not fully charged, so if my body isn’t there is no way I’m leaving the country.

Being sensible with sickle cell is not only a vital part of keeping well, but it’s a vital part of staying alive.

I say YOLO often, but I value my life and would never risk it for a few days of fun.

When this post is published, i’ll be somewhere in the UK wishing I was on the holiday I was supposed to be on, but had to cancel because my body is not at 100%. I’m sure wherever I am i’ll still be giving thanks for life though.

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One Comment Add yours

  1. Rich Smith says:

    Hi, Jenica — Apologies for reaching out through this comment box, but I couldn’t find a better way to contact you directly. Wanted to invite you to share this news with your readers β€” thought it might be of interest to those affected by sickle cell disease:

    Sickle cell disease patients and those who stand with them are invited to pre-register for free access to oneSCDvoice.com, an empowering online community launching in December.

    Promoted as “A Sickle Cell Community Tailored to You,” oneSCDvoice will deliver trustworthy information to help people affected by sickle cell disease know more about it, learn of promising new treatments being tested in clinical trials (and how to access those new treatments as a clinical trial participant), more easily tap into needed support, and above all improve the quality of their lives.

    oneSCDvoice.com is the creation of sickle cell healthcare providers, advocacy leaders, pharmaceutical manufacturer Pfizer, Inc. and health technology company rareLife solutions.

    This collaborative digital education platform provides professionally vetted links to credible information about SCD, about lifestyle issues related to the disease, and about how to get more and better help coping with this devastating genetic condition.

    Read full details at: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/11/prweb14939636.htm

    Like

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